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Kidney Failure​

Are You At Risk? Checklist

Take the first step to kidney health by finding out if you have risk factors for kidney disease!

Qn 1 of 6

Are you obese?

Obesity significantly increases the risk of developing diabetes and hypertension, the two leading causes of kidney failure. According to the Health Promotion Board (HPB), having a BMI of 23kg/m2 and above puts you at moderate risk of being obese. Maintain a healthy weight to minimise your risk of kidney failure.

Qn 2 of 6

Are you diabetic?

Almost half of the diabetics in Singapore are unaware of their condition, which is dangerous as uncontrolled diabetes can damage the blood vessels of the kidney and destroy its filters. Singapore has the highest rate of kidney failure caused by diabetes in the world. Early detection through health screening is of utmost importance as pre-diabetes can be reversed by making changes to your lifestyle.

Being diabetic does not mean that you will develop kidney failure. As long as you manage your blood sugar levels, keep your blood pressure in the normal range and take your medication as prescribed, you can safeguard the health of your kidneys.

Qn 3 of 6

Do you have hypertension?

Hypertension is the second leading cause of kidney failure in Singapore. In fact, one in four Singaporean adults have high blood pressure. Unfortunately, ageing naturally elevates your blood pressure. While there is no turning back the clock, regular checks on your blood pressure and proper management of the condition can decrease your risk of developing kidney failure.

Similar to diabetes, uncontrolled hypertension can progress quickly to kidney failure. In fact, most people experience few to no symptoms at all until the damage to their kidneys are extensive.

Qn 4 of 6

Do you smoke?

On top of cancer and heart disease, smoking is also linked to diabetes, hypertension and other potent risk factors of kidney diseases. Smoking affects the blood flow to the nephrons in kidneys, which perform the essential task of filtering wastes from your blood. Damage to the nephrons are irreversible and may result in kidney failure over time.

Qn 5 of 6

Do you take NSAIDS often?

Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS) like painkillers such as Ibuprofen, Naproxen and Aspirin may be readily available over the counter but they can damage your kidneys if taken excessively. Some people have the misconception that NSAIDS are safe to be taken in large dosages regularly as they do not require a prescription. It is important to know that NSAIDS are not completely without risk and should be consumed carefully, especially for those who already have decreased kidney function.

People who already have reduced kidney function, heart disease or hypertension should consult a doctor before taking NSAIDS as they could increase the risk of kidney diseases. If you have been a regular or heavy user of NSAIDS and suffer from the above-mentioned conditions, you can take a blood or urine test to check if they have affected the functioning of your kidneys.

Qn 6 of 6

Does your family have a history of kidney disease?

Kidney disease may be inherited. If your family has a history of kidney disease, take preventive measures by going for health screenings regularly. A simple urine test can identify if protein is leaking into your urine, which is an indication of an impaired kidney. Otherwise, the Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) is a blood test that indicates how well your kidneys are working to remove wastes from your blood. It is the best way to check the rate at which your kidneys are functioning.

Qn 6 of 6

Does your family have a history of kidney disease?

Kidney disease may be inherited. If your family has a history of kidney disease, take preventive measures by going for health screenings regularly. A simple urine test can identify if protein is leaking into your urine, which is an indication of an impaired kidney. Otherwise, the Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) is a blood test that indicates how well your kidneys are working to remove wastes from your blood. It is the best way to check the rate at which your kidneys are functioning.

You score 0 out of 6!

You have none of the common risk factors for developing chronic kidney disease. Continue to maintain a healthy lifestyle with these 5 simple tips!

  • Shake the salt habit
  • Toss the sugar habit
  • Actively keep fit
  • Regularly drink water
  • Track your health levels

You score 1 out of 6!

You may have one or more of the risk factors for developing chronic kidney disease. It is recommended to go for a health screening that includes a blood test, urine test and a blood pressure measurement. Also, look out for early warning signs and symptoms of kidney disease which may go unnoticed as kidney disease is often called a silent killer.

Watch your waistline

Successful weight management is a lifestyle choice. Weight loss occurs when you burn more calories than you consume. Be careful of products that are marketed as fat-free – they may be high in sugar or sodium.

Learn about the types of fats in your food.

Click here to learn more.

 

Don’t let diabetes sneak up on you

Being diabetic does not mean that you will develop kidney failure. As long as you manage your blood sugar levels, keep your blood pressure in the normal range and take your medication as prescribed, you can safeguard the health of your kidneys.

Here are tips on how you can kick your sugar habit!

Ease the pressure on your kidneys

While there is no turning back the clock, regular checks on your blood pressure and proper management of the condition can decrease your risk of developing kidney failure.

Hypertensive patients should exercise regularly to keep their weight in the healthy range, which in turn lowers your blood pressure.

Find out how you can shake your salt habit and exercise to keep kidney failure at bay.

Stop smoking for good

Your kidneys will thank you for stubbing out. Blood flow to your kidneys will be improved, ensuring that the nephrons, which perform the essential tasks of filtering wastes from your blood, are in tip-top condition.

Consider consulting a doctor to discuss the methods to quit and/or go for Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) if necessary.

Stop popping pills

People who already have reduced kidney function, heart disease or hypertension should consult a doctor before taking NSAIDS as they could increase the risk of kidney diseases. If you have been a regular or heavy user of NSAIDS and suffer from the above-mentioned conditions, you can take a blood or urine test to check if they have affected the functioning of your kidneys.

 

Learn about your family’s health history

Having a family member with kidney disease does not mean that you will definitely develop it as well. While we cannot change our genetics, we can educate ourselves about our health and make good choices that will lower our overall risk factor for developing kidney diseases.

 

 

There is no U-TURN for kidney failure.
Take the next step towards early detection by going for a health screening today!

Note: The above scoring result is not conclusive of your health status and medical condition. Please consult your doctor for a health screening and proper diagnosis.

How do I check if I have kidney failure?

Listen to your kidneys and look out for early warning signs. If you observe having the signs and symptoms of kidney failure, please immediately consult your doctor and your doctor may recommend you renal screening test for further diagnosis.

Your doctor may also check your estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR), which is an indication of your kidneys’ functioning capacity.

As Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) progresses, the eGFR declines. At CKD Stage 5, also known as End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) or kidney failure, the patient requires long-term dialysis or transplant to survive.

What happens if I am diagnosed with kidney failure?

Patients diagnosed with kidney failure will need dialysis or a kidney transplant. However, dialysis cannot fully replace the functions of our kidneys as they work continuously 24 hours, 7 days a week to keep our body composition normal whereas dialysis is intermittent. 

The quality of life of a dialysis patient, to a certain extent, is constrained by the illness. Ideally, a kidney transplant is the best treatment as the transplanted kidney can substitute almost fully the lost functions of the failed kidneys.

8 Secrets to Outsmart the Silent Killer

Maintaining proper kidney health is one of the best ways to prevent Kidney Failure.

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NKF is committed to educate about kidneys health, its causes and steps to take to keep kidneys healthy through our outreach programmes.
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Contact Details
  • Address: 81 Kim Keat Road Singapore 328836
  • Phone: 1800-KIDNEYS (5436397)
  • Email: contact_us@nkfs.org
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The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is deeply committed to journeying with patients every step of the way in their treatment and rehabilitative care, advocating kidney health to prevent kidney failure and making a difference in the renal landscape, to benefit the community.

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